Ann Bennett - KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY / Metropolitan

Posted by Ann Bennett on 2/23/2018

9 Cherokee Avenue, Nashua, NH 03062



Don't pass up the opportunity to live in this well maintained cape in South Nashua! Minutes to Rte 3, Main Dunstable Elementary school, close to shopping and a great commuter location, this home is located in a well established Nashua neighborhood great for walking. This spacious 3 bedroom home has everything you need to move right in. Notice the beautifully maintained hardwood floors and updated bathroom. The kitchen has newer cabinets with lots of storage, a gas range, and plenty of room to add an island! Large bonus/family room in the walk-out basement with new carpet. Other features include a wood stove, central air conditioning, a workshop, updated electrical panel, and a beautiful lot with gardening space.
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Location: 9 Cherokee Avenue, Nashua, NH 03062    Get Directions

Categories: New Homes  

Posted by Ann Bennett on 2/22/2018

When you move into a new home, perhaps one of the first things that you’ll want to do is paint. Really, there’s no right way to choose a paint color. There’s many different methods to find colors that are going to match with your rooms. When you get to the hardware store, you may end up feeling a bit overwhelmed by the hundreds of shades of each and every color that appear on swatches. You can go through many different thought processes in order to choose the color that’s right for each room in your home. 

Don’t Paint First

Sometimes, the best thing to do is to paint after everything else is done. This may seem like a less-than-ideal way to approach moving into your new home, but it works. Paint can always be changed. You can use the strategy of moving into the house first. Then, you’ll buy the furniture to match the room or get your existing furniture reupholstered if needed. If you’re starting from scratch, it’s much more effective to put the larger pieces in and then decide on a paint color.

If You Like It, Paint it!

You really have to like a color for it to be on your walls. You can always get some sample paints and try it on your walls to see if you like the colors. Remember that all the advice in the world can’t replace what you love. You’re the one who has to live with the paint on your walls!

Study Paint Chips

 The overwhelming wall of paint chips at the local hardware store is a necessity when it comes to choosing paint colors. Those little swatches are very useful. Don’t forget about the paint samples mentioned above as well. These small samples can help in really pinning down the color that you like. Remember that you’ll need to ignore the messages that your brain is trying to send you when comparing a sample color to the existing color on the wall. You’ll definitely want to look at samples more than one time for you to really know how you feel about a paint color in a room.   

Don’t Rush

Take time in your space and think about what colors you visualize in the space. Ask yourself, “What kind of mood am I trying to create in this room?” Take your time when making paint color decisions. Sometimes rushing leads to poor decisions.   

Know Your Accent Colors

Understanding how your accent colors will work with certain paint colors will allow you to make a better decision about what kind of paint color to choose. Your paint color will have a relationship with your sofa, the trim, the flooring, the fixtures, the curtains, and more.  Knowing what kind of colors you have to work with from the start can help you to choose the right color to feature in the room.

Posted by Ann Bennett on 2/15/2018

For some home buyers, a home older than a certain date is automatically off the table. But for others the more history a home has the more interested they become in placing a bid. If you are in the latter camp, this article is for you. Owning a historic home isn’t for everyone and there are a few things you should know before beginning your search.  

One disappointment for potential homebuyers can be the limitations historic districts or easements put in place. They can limit what you can and cannot do aesthetically to your home such as paint colors and architectural changes, especially to the front of the house. If you find yourself dreaming of new siding colors, tearing down walls or building additions to make the house “just right”, you may find yourself disappointed. These are common changes that don’t go beyond the drawing board due to limitations in place and can even bring down the value of your home.   

On the plus side, because of these rules in place, the area probably has an active neighborhood association. You can expect well taken care of homes on your street that stay authentic to the historical charm you so love. You’ll have a community to turn to when you’re looking to gain knowledge on renovating and repairing your home. Chances are pretty high they have had to make similar repairs and know the best contractors in the area or where to source materials you’ll need.

And this is great because you’ll want to be prepared for repairs throughout the years to maintain your home. When renovating it’s important that you use the right materials as not doing so could damage your home in the long run if they don’t play well with your home’s existing infrastructure. For this reason, you’ll want to hire historic home specialists and preservationists when it comes time to make repairs.

In historic homes, repair bills can add up especially if you’ve taken on a “project” home. Take your current and projected income into consideration and if you’ll have the ability to keep up with costs. No one wants to live in a permanent construction zone and this can very well be the case if you run out of funds. You may want to consider an FHA 203k loan, aka a rehab mortgage, to help cover these costs especially any large ones you’ll need in the beginning. Some states also offer grants and tax deductions for repairs and maintenance on historic homes.

For each home you consider, hire an inspector that specializes in historical houses and therefore well versed on what to look out for and what the common (and uncommon) warning signs are. Be on the alert for asbestos, mold and lead paint especially if you have or plan to have small children. And know when to walk away, homes with structural issues are usually not worth their while and the issues you’re sure to have with time.

Purchasing a historical home is more than just a buying a house. It’s buying a piece of history with memories imprinted into its floors and walls. It is for this reason you also want to ensure those memories are not toxic or unsafe for your family. This house buying, perhaps more than any other, is one best-given plenty of time to find “The One” that’s perfect for you.  

Posted by Ann Bennett on 2/8/2018

Launching a search for your next home can be a daunting prospect -- especially if you're a first-time home buyer. It's not only a life-changing decision that will have "ripple effects" for years to come, but it's also one of the largest financial commitments you'll every make. So there is a little "pressure" associated with this choice!

The good news is that once you're approved for a mortgage and you know what you want (and can afford) in your next home, then the actual searching part should be a "piece of cake!" Well, as you can imagine, things can and sometimes DO go wrong along the way, but there are effective strategies for simplifying the process and increasing the probability that you'll be delighted with the house you finally close on.

Identify Your Priorities

Knowing what your priorities are and being familiar with all the different features you'll need to evaluate are the first steps to a successful house-hunting campaign. Your real estate agent can be enormously helpful in asking you the right questions, pinpointing your preferences, and guiding you toward the house that will offer the best combination of features, qualities, and characteristics.

Rarely will you find the property that is absolutely perfect in every imaginable way, but when you're clear about the important things you're not willing to compromise on, your final choice is bound to be one that fulfills your requirements and makes you happy! Also keep in mind that once you're the owner, you can customize, decorate, and landscape that home to become whatever you want it to be. Perhaps the only two things that are set in stone are the location and the proximity of the house to neighbors.

I don't know whether this saying has been attributed to any particular person, but it contains a lot of truth about achieving goals, attaining happiness, and finding the home of your dreams: "If you don't know exactly what you want, it's highly unlikely you're going to find it!" That holds true whether you're looking for the ideal job, home, or life partner.

So the question is "How can you zero in on what you need, want, and would find the most satisfying in a house?" Your real estate agent can help you create a priority list or provide you with a boilerplate list that you can work from. If you haven't chosen an agent yet, there is a free home-buying checklist available from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

There are literally dozens of items you'll factor into your home-buying decision, including the square footage, the quality of the neighborhood, the number of bathrooms and bedrooms, the condition of the roof, electrical, and mechanical systems, the size of the backyard, proximity to neighbors, and whether it's conveniently located near supermarkets, medical offices, parks, recreation, good schools, transportation, highways, entertainment, shopping, and much more. The bottom line is this: When you're organized, focused, and clear about what you're looking for in a new home, you're well positioned for a successful outcome!

Categories: house hunting  

Posted by Ann Bennett on 2/1/2018

For homebuyers who want to do everything possible to discover their dream residences, it generally is a good idea to attend open houses. These events make it simple to analyze residences and determine whether they match or surpass your expectations.

Ultimately, there are many reasons to attend an open house, and these include:

1. You can get a first-hand look at a home.

A home listing often provides a great starting point for homebuyers. However, a listing alone fails to empower buyers with the information that they need to fully analyze a house.

By attending an open house, you can get an up-close look at a residence. An open house allows you to walk around a home and view each section of a residence at your convenience. Plus, an open house usually is stress-free, and if you don't like a residence after the event, you can simply continue your search for your dream home.

2. You can receive comprehensive home insights.

During an open house, you can gain home insights that you may struggle to obtain in a home listing. Therefore, homebuyers may want to prepare a list of questions before they attend an open house to ensure they can obtain deep insights into a home's condition.

Moreover, an open house may help you determine whether there is substantial or minimal interest in a residence. If an open house is attended by dozens of potential buyers, you may need to act quickly to submit an offer to secure this residence. Comparatively, if you are the only person to attend an open house, you may be better equipped than ever before to negotiate a home's price with a seller.

3. You can envision what life might be like if you purchase a residence.

When it comes to deciding whether a home is right for you, attending an open house is paramount. In fact, an open house enables you to envision what life may be like if you purchase a residence. And if you feel comfortable with a home after you attend an open house, you can always submit an offer to help transform your homeownership dream into a reality.

If you plan to attend open houses in the foreseeable future, there is no reason to attend these events alone. Fortunately, real estate agents are available who can help you prepare for open houses and ensure you can discover your dream residence.

A real estate agent is a housing market expert who can teach you everything you need to know about buying a home. This housing market professional first will learn about your homebuying goals and craft a personalized homebuying strategy. Then, a real estate agent will keep you up to date about open houses, offer homebuying insights and do everything possible to help you find a home that you can enjoy for years to come.

Reach out to a real estate agent today. By doing so, you can start attending open houses and boost the likelihood of a successful homebuying experience.

Categories: Open House   Buying a Home